Biot Emergers…

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Black Biot Emerger

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Yellow Biot Emerger

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Olive Biot Emerger

I like using goose biots on cdc-emergers. This style of flies are usually my first choice when fishing mayfly hatches. I tend to use snowshoe-rabbit more than cdc for emergers, but on these it still is the best choice. The reason for using snowshoe is it produces more durable flies and that it is easier to clean after a catch. I tie a lot of different mayfly pattern these days. Customers just does’nt seem to understand what I mean when I say “please,order in good time for next season”.

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Nail Lacquer Midge…

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Why UV when you’ve got a woman in the house? I realize that the different UV options give a nicer fly,but nail lacquer is always available. Besides it’s available in a well of colors, at least in my house.
I have used the brand named O.P.I for these ones…these are tied after a few beers as well,so if they look a bit scruffy you’ll know why…

The Dun Deal…

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In my early years of fly tying I thought that parachute patterns was the best imitation for the dun stage. That was also what I learned from the magazines,books and the more experienced anglers I knew. The truth is that a parachute fly really imitates the change from nymph to dun. It also works great as a drowned dun in rough waters or weather conditions. I find myself fishing the emergers and spent spinners way more than I do the dun stage. To our eyes the parachute may look as the perfect imitation for a dun, but it’s really not.
That’s why I carry a bunch of classic hackled flies in my boxes,in addition to parachutes and all the other oddballs I may create during the winter. I absolutely prefer the Catskill patterns for this purpose,but using ordinary dubbing and antron yarn in the wings makes it easier and faster to tie. I find this style of flies to be very durable as well as easy for the beginner. I normally tie the wing using V-style, but don’t make them to thick, as this will disturb the balance of the fly. If desireable one can use fluorescent color for the wing. It seems to mean nothing to the fish…

Emergent Sparkle Pupa…

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It’s kind of strange to think about,but this fly has been a staple in my box for over 20 years now. It is a fantastic pattern. The reason for it’s incredible ability to fool trout is the special “touch-dub” method. Use a very sticky dubbing wax and make a blend of antron and fur/synthetics.When using this dubbing technique combined with real antron yarn the fly traps hundreds of shiny air bubbles. This feature is what attracts the fish and makes it go for the fly. During caddis hatches this fly can really work wonders. It must be Gary La Fontaine’s most succesfull pattern.
This is the color combination that works best for me, but I also use brown,rusty and yellowish colors. If this is not in your box already,then make sure it’s there before the season begins…Remember,it´s very important to tie it sparse and airy!