CdC Dun…

Mix 1

I have been obsessed with using mallard in the wings for duns and emergers lately. This is an attempt to make a sbs of the CdC Dun. I apologize for the poor quality photos. But they will at least give you a general idea. For this pattern you will need a splitable thread. You can use Dynema, Serafil or Petijean threads.

Tail 1

1. Tie in a tail of rooster or Coq de Leon fibers. Make it a bit longer than normal.

Body Wing 1

2. Now prepare the peacock quill and tie it in. I do not use UV (yet), so i just use standard varnish. Choose a bunch of mallard and gather them to make the impression of a wing.

Clamp

3. There are lots of tools for this purpose out there. The best are, without a doubt, the ones from Marc Petijean, but an old-school paper clip will do the trick as well. Choose two cdc feathers, a mix of grey and black is usually a good choice. Cut them close to the stem.

cdc 1

4. Split the thread and spin the cdc to make the hackle. Pull the fibers bacwards and wind the cdc as a hackle.

CdC Quill 1

Dun 2

5. The end result should look something like this. The colors can off course be changed to suit all mayflies…

Div 1

Barrio Fly Lines…

Barrio Fly 2A few days ago I ordered three lines from Barrio Fly Lines, and today I recieved a package. Inside there were three nicely packaged fly lines. There was also a hand-written letter from Mike himself. When did you last see something like that? I find this so nice and rare I had to do a post on it. Such a nice gesture…

I must note that this is my first encounter with Barrio lines, but I am really looking forward to get them on the water. Reviews from sources that I trust sounds promising. Besides they look and feel great as well, not to mention the price range. I will also post a review sometime in the future…Thanks and best wishes to you, Mike:)

Check out Mike´s shop here: http://www.flylineshop.com/

I tie tonite what I fish tomorrow…

Tonite 4

I need flies. It happens almost every time, the night before going on a fishing trip, I end up kind of panic tying. We can probably not expect mayflies to hatch, it is still early around here,. There will be midges/diptera and maybe some stoneflies. If the temprature should rise, and (just by chance) the sun arrive there might be some Claret/Sepia Dun  (Leptophlebia vespertina/marginata ) dancing in the air. But, if nothing happens on the surface I will reach for the of monsters. By that I mean damsels/dragons and other scary stuff tied in the darkest hour.

The above fly is a “new” creation, and it sinks! Gold bead with extra tungsten/lead. The tail is a mixture of marabou, with a spun rabbit thorax and peacock. It really is a monster! It will definately fool a fish or two no matter the conditions.

These are some  of the flies that will fill my box tomorrow, fresh off the vise…

Tonite 1

Tonite 2

Tonite 3

Nymph of the week – Montana

Montana 1

Where would I be without Montana? This pattern functioned as my saviour in my early days as a fly fisherman. It helped me through the great frustration and despair of not catching anything. If I remember correctly this was the fly that gave me my first trout on a fly rod. The last few years it has almost been forgotten in a corner of my nymph box. The pattern was created for the big rivers of Montana as a stonefly nymph. I have always used it as an attractor, and I tie it in many different colors, even with rubber legs at times. It works great on norwegian stillwaters, and I vary the retrieve from very slow to quick short moves. This pattern needs a lot of weight. I also tend to use a larger hackle than the original pattern. The reason is to give the fly more movement when fished in stillwaters…

Montana 2

Montana 3Chartreuse Montana with marabou tail…

Classic Buzzer…

Spring fishing means midges all over the place. Both the the adults and the pupaes are cool imitations to fish. The fish, even the small ones, can be extremely selective and difficult. I did a post on these some time ago, but I wanted to present them again. This pattern has always been in my boxes. Besides being one of the first flies I learned to tie, it is also one of my most fished patterns. The colors presented here are my two favourites. The green one seems to be the best in my local waters.This one rarely fails on rising trout…in our times of UV domination, on all kinds of flies, this really is an old school pattern.

Air

1. Tie in some strands of clear antron. Do not cut the ends at this point.

Flosscopper

2. Tie in the copper thread and the floss.

Abdomen

3. Wind the floss around the hook shank. Follow with the copper in nice turns as a ribbing.

Floss Midge

4. Tie in two strands of peacock herl to form the thorax. Whip-finish and varnish.

Midge Red

Floss Buzzer Red…