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Filling the box…

Dun

Filling the boxes for the rivers of eastern Norway. I will need a nice selection of mayflies, because many species hatch in the different rivers.I like these simple patterns. They are easy and fast to tie, and the color variations are endless. They can off course be tied with nice tails, but I do not think the fish will care. With a possible exception of the largest species. Fish in fast flowing water do not always have the time to study the menu…

Some Kind

Sulphur

Danica

Vulgata

No-wing Dun…

Hackle Dun 1

I remember a discussion once about the importance of the wing on mayfly patterns. Off course, in some cases it is crucial, but in fast flowing waters it is of minor importance. Since then I have always had a few No-Wing patterns in my box. I like to enhance the thorax by using peacock herl. For the body I would normally choose some kind of biot. It can also be a good choice during a large hatch, as well as in windy conditions. Tied this way, with no wing, the fly never fails presentation…

Green

Hackle Dun 2

Hackle Dun 3

Hackle Dun 4

CdC Dun…

Mix 1

I have been obsessed with using mallard in the wings for duns and emergers lately. This is an attempt to make a sbs of the CdC Dun. I apologize for the poor quality photos. But they will at least give you a general idea. For this pattern you will need a splitable thread. You can use Dynema, Serafil or Petijean threads.

Tail 1

1. Tie in a tail of rooster or Coq de Leon fibers. Make it a bit longer than normal.

Body Wing 1

2. Now prepare the peacock quill and tie it in. I do not use UV (yet), so i just use standard varnish. Choose a bunch of mallard and gather them to make the impression of a wing.

Clamp

3. There are lots of tools for this purpose out there. The best are, without a doubt, the ones from Marc Petijean, but an old-school paper clip will do the trick as well. Choose two cdc feathers, a mix of grey and black is usually a good choice. Cut them close to the stem.

cdc 1

4. Split the thread and spin the cdc to make the hackle. Pull the fibers bacwards and wind the cdc as a hackle.

CdC Quill 1

Dun 2

5. The end result should look something like this. The colors can off course be changed to suit all mayflies…

Div 1

I tie tonite what I fish tomorrow…

Tonite 4

I need flies. It happens almost every time, the night before going on a fishing trip, I end up kind of panic tying. We can probably not expect mayflies to hatch, it is still early around here,. There will be midges/diptera and maybe some stoneflies. If the temprature should rise, and (just by chance) the sun arrive there might be some Claret/Sepia Dun  (Leptophlebia vespertina/marginata ) dancing in the air. But, if nothing happens on the surface I will reach for the of monsters. By that I mean damsels/dragons and other scary stuff tied in the darkest hour.

The above fly is a “new” creation, and it sinks! Gold bead with extra tungsten/lead. The tail is a mixture of marabou, with a spun rabbit thorax and peacock. It really is a monster! It will definately fool a fish or two no matter the conditions.

These are some  of the flies that will fill my box tomorrow, fresh off the vise…

Tonite 1

Tonite 2

Tonite 3

Wulff…

Wulff 4

Lee Wulff is a legend in fly fishing and his flies really are icons. I have mentioned earlier that I love american classics. Lee Wulff tied the first ones all the way back in 1929, and this style of tying has inspired thousands of fly tiers around the globe. The style of tying are numerous,but they always have the wing in common. As always there will be discussions on how the Wulff really ought to look like,as with all variants of patterns. I have taken the liberty to change the material for the tail. I mainly use moose mane,rather than bucktail. The reason is purely aesthetic. I use and tie the many of the established variants in the series,and have added a few color variations for myself. These flies are excellent searching patterns,and they work especially well on fast flowing rivers. I find them both beautiful and efficient for a great deal of fishing situations.

Wulff Variant

Tying Catskill-style…

I very often look to Mike Valla´s brilliant book “Tying Catskill-style Dry Flies”(2009) for inspiration. Everyone who is serious about tying and fishing Catskill-style patterns should read this. The last couple of weeks I have been occupied tying for a local shop. That means tying at least 20-30 of the same pattern every day,but I´m not good at keeping the numbers up anymore…(starting to get old). This morning I just had to tie something else. Tying flies inspired by this style has a relaxing effect on me. All tiers have their own style and their own way of doing things,and patterns develop around the world. I tend to tie my Catkills with a shorter hackle and they are dressed a bit more “bulky”. I also often tie them in darker colors. That´s simply because that style suits my fishing better. I tie them this way for the same reasons the Catskill-style developed inspired by english tying-styles. That is to make the flies suitable for and effective in my area or region of the world,or wherever else I might be fishing. Hooks here are TMC 531 sz.13 and TMC 100 sz. 12.