Nymph of the week – Montana

Montana 1

Where would I be without Montana? This pattern functioned as my saviour in my early days as a fly fisherman. It helped me through the great frustration and despair of not catching anything. If I remember correctly this was the fly that gave me my first trout on a fly rod. The last few years it has almost been forgotten in a corner of my nymph box. The pattern was created for the big rivers of Montana as a stonefly nymph. I have always used it as an attractor, and I tie it in many different colors, even with rubber legs at times. It works great on norwegian stillwaters, and I vary the retrieve from very slow to quick short moves. This pattern needs a lot of weight. I also tend to use a larger hackle than the original pattern. The reason is to give the fly more movement when fished in stillwaters…

Montana 2

Montana 3Chartreuse Montana with marabou tail…

Pheasant Variations…

Pheasant Tail 1

This pattern do not need any introduction. Both the pattern and it´s creator are icons of fly fishing, and well known to everybody. The variations are countless, and they are probably all great fishing flies. The Pheasant Tails presented here are sort of standards in my boxes. I find it difficult to choose one in particular. These work very well in rivers and stillwater all over the globe. I do tend catch more fish in stillwater when using the variant with hare dubbing in the thorax rather than the classic pattern. The Teeny nymph is also a great fly,especially in rivers. It is one out of thousands of patterns inspired by this great old classic. Thank you,Sawyer…

Pheasant Hare

Pheasant Hare…

Pheasant Peacock

Pheasant Peacock…

Teeny

Teeny Nymph…

Daddy Long Legs…

The Daddy Long Legs is a crucial pattern when fishing in Scandinavia. When fishing high altitude lakes and stillwater in general it will also work very well as an attractor. The fly can be tied in numerous ways,with a vast variety of materials,and they´ll probably all be great fishing flies. The legs can also be made from many different materials. I do not think it is necessary to tie knots on quills,but it looks very nice. I have a great little tool for this purpose. Here´s a few suggestions…

This is close to the original pattern. Sort of the classic english tying style. Legs from pheasant,wings from hackle tips and a turkey quill body. I use the thread as ribbing to secure the quill body.

This is a more modern version with a foam body. Sometimes,when the wind is rough you´ll need the fly to float better,then foam is a good option. This one is tied by Kjell Karlsen.

Here is a version with extended abdomen made from micro-chenille,japanese organza for the wings and cdc hackle. The legs on this one are made from ozark turkey quills.

Marabou Damsel Nymph…

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There must be thousands of damsel nymph variants out there, but this one is in a league of its own. This pattern is designed by Gary Borger. It is by far the most succsesfull damsel nymph I have ever fished. The fly is almost magical in my opinion. Damsel nymphs are available to the fish all the time, but it is during hatches they are most effective. There is also something magical about peacock herl as a component. This fly swims and wiggles just like the natural. The following is what GB says about damsel nymphs:

“Damsel nymphs are very strong swimmers, moving through the water with a strong side to side sweeping motion of the abdomen and tails. They don’t rip along like minnows might, but they certainly show plenty of action as they head from the weeds beds of the lake to the shore, or a rock, or a log, or a reed, or an angler, and there to crawl out before the adult emerges.” (http://www.garyborger.com/)

If you are fishing stillwater in Norway it is crucial to carry imitations of damsels and dragon flies in your box. The nymph is active all the time and during hatches they can appear in large numbers.